Edmund ("Terry") Burke III

TitleProfessor Emeritus,
Research Professor of History,
Director: Center For World History
DivisionHumanities Division
DepartmentHistory Department
AffiliationsSouth Asia Studies,
Environmental Studies Department
Phone831-459-2287 (office),
831-459-1924 (message)
Email
Web Site Center for World History
Office531 Humanities 1
Office HoursWinter 2013: Tuesdays 12:30 - 1:30 pm and Wednesdays 1:30 - 2:30
Campus Mail StopHumanities Academic Services
Mail1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA
95064
picture of Edmund (

Research Interests

Modern Middle East and North African history, Mediterranean history, French history, orientalism, European imperialism, environmental history and world history.

Biography, Education and Training

Edmund Burke, III is Research Professor of modern Middle Eastern and World history at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he directs the Center for World History. Burke is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on Middle East and North African history, orientalism, environmental history and world history.

He is the author of Prelude To Protectorate in Morocco, 1860-1912: Patterns of Pre-Colonial Protest and Resistance (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1976), Arabic translation 2013 and The Ethnographic State: France and Moroccan Islam (forthcoming).

Other books include: Environmental Imaginaries of the Middle East: History, Policy, Power and Practice (Columbus OH: Ohio University Press, 2011; The Environment and World History, 1500-2000 (University of California Press, 2009); Genealogies of Orientalism: History, Theory, Politics (University of Nebraska Press, 2008); Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East (Berkeley: University of California Press, second edition 2006); Rethinking World History: Essays on Europe, Islam and World History by Marshall G.S. Hodgson (Cambridge University Press, 1993); Global Crises and Social Movements: Artisans, Peasants, Populists and the World Economy (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1988) and Islam, Politics and Social Movements (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988).

Honors, Awards and Grants

Graduated from University of Notre Dame cum laude (1962); at Princeton: Woodrow Wilson Fellow, 1962-63; Danforth Fellow, 1963-65; NDEA-related Fulbright-Hays Fellow, 1965-67; National Defense Foreign Language Fellow, 1967-68; at UCSC: Carnegie Fellow, 1969-70; Social Science Research Council grantee, 1973-74, summer 1975; National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, summer 1978; National Science Foundation grantee, 1981; N.E.H. Fellowship, 1984-85; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellow, 1989-90; National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, summer 1997; Sabbagh Lecture in Middle East Studies (University of Arizona, Tucson), February 21-22, 2002; University of California Presidential Chair in World History, 2003-2007; Carson Endowed Lecture in History, Oregon State University, February 9, 2008; Fernand Braudel Research Fellow, European University Institute (Florence).

Selected Publications

Genealogies of Orientalism: History, Theory, Politics ed. with D. Prochaska. University of Nebraska Press, 2008.

The Environment and World History, ed. with K. L. Pomeranz (under submission).

Struggle and Survival in the Modern Middle East, ed. with D. Yaghoubian. Berkeley: University of California Press, Second edition, 2005.

Environmental Imaginaries of the Middle East: History, Policy, Power & Practice, ed. with Diana Davis. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2011

World History: The Big Eras, with David Chirstian and Ross E. Dunn. 2nd ed., (Los Angeles: National Center for History in the Schools, 2011.

"Collective Action and Discursive Shifts: A Comparative Historical Perspective" UC eScholarship Repository "Orientalism and World History: Representing Middle Eastern Nationalism and Islamism in the Twentieth Century" UC eScholarship Repository

"Theorizing the Histories of Colonialism and Nationalism in North Africa: Beyond Colonialism and Nationalism in North Africa", Arab Studies Quarterly (ASQ), Spring, 1998 24 Hour Scholar

Teaching Interests

I am currently retired, but still teach occasionally. I still teach upper division survey courses in the history of the modern world from 1450-1950. Over the last decade they have used histories of production and consumption as lenses to grasp the unfolding of the modern era. Over the last decade I also developed and taught an upper division survey course, "The Mediterranean in the Modern Age, 1492-1942," as well as a senior seminar, "The Mediterranean in the Cold War, 1942-1992.

Courses Taught

HIS 41, The Making of the Modern Middle East
HIS 101A, The Making of the Modern World, 1400–1750
HIS 101B, The Making of the Modern World, 1750–1950
HIS 102C, The Mediterranean in the Modern Era, 1730–1930
HIS 154A, Classic Islamic Civilization
HIS 194R, Cairo: The City Victorious, 1750–2000
HIS 194X, The Cold War in the Mediterranean, 1942–1991